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How to Get Out of a Payday Loan

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How to Get Out of a Payday Loan

The payday loan trap begins innocently enough. You’re low on cash, you’ve maxed out your credit cards, and none of your family or friends can loan you the money. Borrowing $250 from a payday lender seems like a logical solution. As long as the $250 plus a $37.50 fee is paid at the end of the two-week term – the time your next paycheck comes due – you’ll be debt free. No harm, no foul.

Before you know it, you run out of money again and can’t repay the loan two weeks later. So you pay a fee to extend the loan for another 14 days. When the next term is up, you can have the lender cash your check or draw from your account for the initial amount of $250 plus the $37.50 fee, or you can pay to extend, yet again, with another fee payment.

This plot replays itself over and over again for months on end. After a year, you will have paid $975 to borrow $250. Effectively, you borrowed money with an annual percentage rate (APR) of 390%.

“It’s important to note that payday loans are structured intentionally to make it very difficult to walk away from,” says Diane Standaert, executive vice president and director of state policy at the Center for Responsible Lending. “The lender takes direct access to a borrower’s bank account in order to establish the loan, either through a check or direct access to their online account. This leverage creates a business model that makes it nearly impossible to walk away.”

This is the payday loan debt trap, but it can get worse. In this guide, we’ll explain how to get out from under a payday loan and avoid falling into the trap again.

How to Get Out of the Payday Loan Trap

There are several strategies to get out of the vicious payday loan cycle, and the strategy you choose to implement will largely depend on your financial situation.

To free up funds to pay back your loan, you’ll have to cut expenses where you can. Start by creating a budget and look at costs that are easy to cut like restaurants and other discretionary spending such as shopping trips and travel.

Next, move to some medium-cost necessities like the cable, internet, and cellphone bill or auto and rental insurance premiums. Call these companies and negotiate with them to lower costs or see if you qualify for a discount.

If you’re still having a difficult time coming up with the extra cash to pay down your loans, look to some larger expenses like your car payment and rent. It may be in your best interest to sell your car and find a more affordable mode of transportation or a less-expensive car. Consider moving or getting a roommate to reduce the cost of rent.

Finding extra money in your budget will allow you to put more income toward the debt you have acquired and catch up on your payday loans.

Work with your lenders

While you create a budget, go to your payday lender and ask if they can provide you with an extended payment plan (EPP). EPPs give the borrower more time to pay off a loan without added fees and interest and without getting turned over to a collections agency, as long as the borrower doesn’t default on the EPP.

If your lender doesn’t offer an extended payment plan, you may want to turn to any other entities you owe money to. If you have non-payday loan debt, like credit card debt, auto loans, student loans, and the like, talk to the lenders of these debts to see if they can help restructuring your debt.

Restructuring means your lender could extend the term of the loan to reduce the cost of monthly payments, or reduce the frequency of payments being made. For some student loans, you may be allowed to make income-based repayments. By reducing other required monthly payments, you will be able to put more money toward paying down your payday loans. Note that restructuring could impact your credit score, but will not be as costly as bankruptcy.

Other lenders who might be able to help

Whether you choose to work with a credit counselor or tackle the payday loan repayment on your own, another option is to seek alternative lenders who may be able to assist with getting you out of the payday lending debt cycle.

Alternative Lender #1: Friends and Family Financing

Receiving a small loan from your family is a popular option suggested on the credit website message boards. This can help you make a one-time payment to the payday lender and close your payday loan once and for all. After which, you can pay back your family in small payments made up of the fees you would have otherwise been paying to the payday lender. Typically, friends and family won’t charge you added fees or interest, so this is the most preferred and affordable route for a borrower who is strapped for cash.

Alternative Lender #2: Faith-Based Organizations and Military Relief

If you are a military servicemember or veteran or a have a religious affiliation, your participation could open up short-term lending and relief opportunities.

A few faith-based lenders have cropped up around the U.S. that are primarily focused on helping borrowers refinance their payday loans and get out of the payday lending debt cycle. One example is Exodus Lending, a nonprofit organization in Minnesota that pays off their clients’ payday loans in exchange for their clients’ paying Exodus for the loan balance over the course of 12 months without interest or additional fees.

Military service members also have protections and emergency relief assistance through various veterans organizations.

Alternative Lender #3: Personal Loans

Find cheaper funding with a personal loan through your local credit union or our personal loan database.

With a 600+ credit score, you may be able to secure a personal loan with an average APR between 6% and 36%, a range considerably lower than the 400% to 700% APRs that come with payday lending. Use the funds you receive through your personal loan to pay off all outstanding payday loans and close the door to payday lending for good.

Then make the minimum monthly loan payment for your new personal loan on time and in full.

Once you’ve built your credit above the 600 threshold, visit your local credit union to apply for a personal loan.

Continue to improve your credit score with responsible personal loan and credit card repayments. Over time, your score will improve yet again. Once your score is over 700, you will be eligible for even more affordable personal loans with APRs as low as 4%.

Are there times it makes sense to walk away?

There are times when bankruptcy is the best option to relieve debts you are not able to pay back. If you choose to go this route, you will be required to obtain a pre-bankruptcy credit counselor before you file.

It’s important to find a government-approved credit counselor through the U.S. Trustee Program (USTP) to ensure a reasonable counseling rate – a fee of less than or equal to $50 is considered reasonable. USTP-approved agencies are required to inform clients that services are available for free or at a reduced rate, based on the client’s ability to pay, prior to the exchange of any information and the counseling session.

A credit counselor will help evaluate your personal financial situation, create a personal budget plan, and look into alternatives to filing for bankruptcy, like restructuring debt or negotiating with your payday lender. After all options have been exhausted, your counselor can help you explore your options for bankruptcy.

Many borrowers have been told that bankruptcy is irrelevant for payday lending. They also fear that they could be arrested if they fail to make payments. This is a common myth spread by debt collectors for payday lenders. These threats are illegal, and if they happen to you, make sure to contact your state attorney general and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Low credit ratings and the absence of access to a bank account can lead to exceedingly expensive financial products. A Vanderbilt University Law School study found evidence that access to payday loans increases personal bankruptcy rates, doubling Chapter 13 bankruptcy filings for first-time payday loan applicants within two years.

How payday loans can lead to bankruptcy

Most payday loans are secured by getting access to a borrower’s online checking account or by receiving a signed check from the borrower for the amount of the loan plus the loan borrowing fee.

When borrowers fail to make their payment upon the loan due date, and don’t pay the extension fee, the lender can withdraw the amount due through the borrower’s online account or cash the signed check.

If the borrower doesn’t have enough funds in their account to cover the amount rendered, their check will bounce and they will incur a bounced check fee and a returned check, which impacts the borrower’s credit report and credit rating. With a record of bounced checks, the bank can go as far as shutting down the borrower’s bank account and make it difficult for the borrower to obtain any new accounts.

What are your rights with a lender?

To begin the fight against payday loans, we must review the borrower’s rights when they enter the loan agreement, understand how lenders get away with hemorrhaging money from borrowers, and what legislation is doing about it.

Payday lending isn’t legal in every state. Fifteen states and the District of Columbia (see the map above) have effectively capped payday loan interest rates at 36% APR. Residents of the remaining states without APR caps stay unprotected against the harm of the inescapable payday lending debt cycle.

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), payday lenders are not required by federal law to offer borrowers the lowest rates available. This is because lenders charge a fixed-fee price. Some states, as Standaert mentioned, cap these fees such that the annual rate for a two-week loan doesn’t exceed the enforced rate cap.

Although lenders are not legally bound to offer the lowest rates available, federal law requires payday lenders to disclose the cost of the loan in terms of an annual APR, so the borrower will see on the website or on their contract that the interest rate is 300% or more, according to Standaert.

“Though, disclosures of the price alone do not alleviate the concerns about the predatory structures of this product,” says Standaert. “Payday loans are marketed as a quick fix to a financial emergency, but payday lenders know that their business model is built on keeping people trapped in debt they can’t repay.”

Fees versus interest

It’s important to note the language lenders use in how they structure these financial products. Payday lenders are able to charge excessive amounts in “interest” because in reality, they aren’t charging interest, they’re charging a fee.

If your payday loan were treated as a loan with a designated payback period, interest rate, and amortization schedule, then for every payment you made over the course of time you borrowed the money, a portion of your $37.50 would go to pay down your $250 loan balance.

In the case of payday loans, every payment you make to extend the loan is purely a fee-based payment, or interest-only payment with a 100% principal payment at the end of the term.

What legislation has done and will do

“A rate cap, such as what the fifteen states and D.C. have enforced, is the strongest protection they can enact on the state level. There is activity at the federal level as well,” says Standaert.

“The CFPB, has been working for the past several years to rein in the harms of the payday lending debt trap,” adds Standaert. “While the CFPB doesn’t have authority to enforce a rate cap, their strongest role is to establish rules that enforce payday lenders to assess whether the loan is affordable in light of a borrower’s income and expenses prior to issuing a loan.”

“While states have the ability to address cost, the CFPB can address the harmful nature of these loans,” says Standaert. “Restricting the predatory business practice of payday lending can allow better financial products to come to the forefront for borrowers who need financial relief.”

Standaert said that the Center for Responsible Lending and other organizations dedicated to fair financial products for consumers have seen overwhelming support for the CFPB and states to crack down on payday loans.

“Seventy-five percent of voters in South Dakota went to the ballot box this November and voted to reduce the cost of payday lending from 500% to 36%,” says Standaert. “This was the first time voters have reached a conclusion of this sort.”

Who to contact if your lender is being unfair

Standaert suggests that borrowers should file complaints with their state attorney general and the CFPB at consumerfinance.gov/complaint.

“Whether the cost is too high, they have issues with how their bank account is being treated, or they have experienced unfair debt collection tactics, the CFPB accepts complaints for people from all around the country struggling with payday loans for all kinds of reasons,” says Standaert.

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Live Richer Challenge: 5 Rules to Boost Your Credit Score

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The editorial content on this page is not provided by any financial institution and has not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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Improving a low credit score can feel like an overwhelming task. But you only need to follow these five simple rules to improve your credit score.

Rule 1: Keep your utilization rate low

Utilization is the amount of your credit limit you spend each month. For example, if you have a $500 credit limit and spend $50 in a month, you’re utilization will be 10%. Your utilization is part of what determines your credit score.

Your goal should be to never exceed 20% of your total credit limit across all of your cards. That means if you have three credit cards with a total available limit of $5,000, you should never carry more than a combined total of $1,000 across the three cards. The lower your utilization rate, the better your score will be.

We recommend you make one small purchase a month to keep your utilization low and help increase your credit score at a faster rate.

Rule 2: Pay in full and on time each month

Being late on your payments has a huge, negative impact on your credit score.

There is also no advantage to only paying the minimum amount due on your card. That will only result in your paying more interest and does nothing to help your credit score. So just save yourself money and pay your entire bill. The easiest way to prove you’re responsible is to only charge what you can afford. Never use your credit card to buy an item you won’t be able to pay off on time and in full each month.

Rule 3: Eliminate lingering debt

If you’re already in debt you can’t afford to pay off, make sure you continue to pay at least the minimum due on time each month. Paying on time is the number one way to boost your credit score.

Then, get to work chipping away at that debt until it’s gone. Two of the most popular strategies to eliminate debt are the debt snowball and the debt avalanche.

Balance transfer: A balance transfer or personal loan can help you consolidate your debt and reduce your interest rate. If you trust yourself to open a new credit card but not spend on it, consider a balance transfer. You may be able to cut your rate with a long 0% intro annual percentage rate (APR). You need to have a good credit score, and you might not get approved for the full amount that you want to transfer.

Personal loan: Consider applying for a personal loan and using the money from the loan to pay off your credit card debt. Personal loan companies have interest rates that start as low as 4.25%, and they approve people with credit scores as low as 550.

Use our simple comparison tool to find personal loan offers. Then, easily see if you prequalify for a loan without dinging your credit in the process.

After you pay off your credit cards with the proceeds on the loan, do not build up your debt again. Instead, just make one purchase each month and pay it off in full.

Once you pay off your cards, resist the urge to close them. Closing your cards will not only lower your utilization but also remove history which damages your score in the “length of history” category.

Rule 4: Resist temptation

You’ll start to get credit card offers as you begin to build your credit history and improve your score. Beware of any offers, especially for cashback cards, while your score is below 650. These cards typically provide little value and can smack you with high interest rates if you fail to follow Rule 3 above.

Not sure if an offer is a good deal? Try checking it out on our cashback reward cards page. Our MagnifyMoney Transparency Score will let you know if it’s the real deal.

Once you get your credit score above 680, the good credit card offers will start rolling in. You can have your pick of the top-tier reward credit cards and start using your regular spending to get cashback or rack up points for travel.

Rule 5: Protect your score

Once you’ve achieved a higher credit score, be sure to protect it by following these simple steps:

  • Charge a small amount to the card each month and pay it off in full.
  • Aim to carry a balance that is no more than 20% of your available credit limit.
  • Sign up for a credit monitoring service such as Credit Karma, Discover’s credit scorecard, or another service that lets you check your report monthly, for free. You can also get a free annual credit report from all three bureaus at AnnualCreditReport.com.

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College Students and Recent Grads, Pay Down My Debt, Reviews

CommonBond Student Loan Refinance Loan Review

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CommonBond Grad Student Loan Refinance Loan Review

Updated February 9, 2017

CommonBond was founded by three Wharton MBAs who felt the sting of student loans after they graduated. The founders decided to provide a better solution for graduates, as they thought the student loan system was broken and in need of reform. As a result, they strive to make the refinance (and borrowing) process as simple and straightforward for graduates as possible.

CommonBond* began by servicing students from just one school, and has rapidly expanded. Today, CommonBond loans are available to graduates of over 2,000 schools nationwide. Although the business started servicing only students with graduate degrees, today CommonBond is also available to refinance undergraduate degrees as well.

CommonBond is one of the top four lenders identified by MagnifyMoney to refinance student loans.

As you might be able to tell by the name, CommonBond thinks of its community as family. There is a network of alumni and professionals within the community that want to help borrowers. This alone sets it apart from other lenders, as members often meet for events.

While these are all great things, we know you’re more interested in how CommonBond might be able to help you make your student loans more affordable. Let’s take a look at what terms and rates they offer, eligibility requirements, and how they compare against other lenders.

Refinance Terms Offered

CommonBond offers low variable and fixed rate loans. Variable rates range from 2.35% – 6.27% APR, and fixed rates range from 3.37% – 7.74% APR.

Note that these rates take a 0.25% auto pay discount into consideration.

There is no maximum loan amount. CommonBond will lend what you can afford to repay. CommonBond offers fixed and variable rates with terms of 5, 10, 15, and 20 years.

The hybrid loan is only offered on a 10 year term – the first 5 years will have a fixed rate, and the 5 years after that will have a variable rate.

CommonBond has a great chart listing repayment examples based off of borrowing $10,000, which can be found on its rates and terms page.

To pull an example from that, if you borrow $10,000 at a fixed 4.74% APR on a 10 year term, your monthly payment will be $104.80. The total amount you will pay over the 10 year period will be $12,575.90.

The Pros and Cons

CommonBond is available to graduates of 2,000 universities. While that is a very long list, not all colleges and universities are included.

One pro to consider is the hybrid loan option available. It might seem a little confusing at first – why would someone want a variable rate down the road?

If you’re confident you’ll be able to make extra payments on your loan and pay it off before the 5 years are up, you might be better off going with the hybrid option (if you can get a better interest rate on it).

This is because you’ll end up paying less over the life of the loan with a lower interest rate. If you were offered a 10 year loan with a fixed rate of 6.49% APR, and a hybrid loan with a beginning rate of 5.64%, the hybrid option would be the better deal if you’re intent on paying it off quickly.

What You Need to Qualify

CommonBond doesn’t list many eligibility requirements on its website, aside from the following:

  • You must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident
  • You must have graduated

CommonBond doesn’t specify a minimum credit score needed, but based on the requirements of other lenders, we recommend having a score of 660+, though you should be aiming for 700+. The good news is CommonBond lets you apply with a cosigner in case your credit isn’t good enough.

Documents and Information Needed to Apply

CommonBond’s application process is very simple – it says it takes as little as 2 minutes to complete. Initially, you’ll be asked for basic information such as your name, address, and school.

Once you complete this part, CommonBond will perform a soft credit pull to estimate your rates and terms.

If you want to move forward with the rates and terms offered, you’ll be required to submit documentation and a hard credit inquiry will be conducted. CommonBond lists the following as required:

  • Pay stubs or tax returns (proof of employment)
  • Diploma or transcript (proof of graduation)
  • Student loan bank statement
  • ID, utility bills, lease agreement (proof of residency)

CommonBond also notes it can take up to 5 business days to verify documents submitted, so the loan doesn’t happen instantaneously.

Once your documents are approved, you electronically sign for the loan, and CommonBond will begin the process of paying off your previous lenders. It notes this can take up to two weeks from the time the loan is accepted.

Who Benefits the Most from Refinancing Student Loans with CommonBond?

Borrowers who are looking to refinance a large amount of student loan debt will benefit the most from refinancing with them.

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Keeping an Eye on the Fine Print

CommonBond does not have a prepayment penalty, and there are no origination fees nor application fees associated with refinancing.

As with other lenders, there is a late payment fee. This is 5% of the unpaid amount of the payment due, or $10, whichever is less.

If a payment fails to go through, you’ll be charged a $15 fee.

It’s also noted that failure to make payments may result in the loss of the 0.25% interest rate deduction from auto pay.

Transparency Score

Getting in touch with a representative is simple and there is a chat and call option right on the homepage. Some lenders have this hidden at the bottom, or they don’t offer a chat option at all.

CommonBond also lets borrowers know they can shop around within a 30 day period to lessen the impact on their credit.

It does not list its late fees on its website, unlike other lenders. However, after making a chat inquiry, the question was answered promptly.

CommonBond does offer a cosigner release and is ranked with a A+ transparency score.

Alternative Student Loan Refinancing Lenders

The student loan refinancing market continues to get more competitive, and it makes sense to shop around for the best deal.

One of the market leaders is SoFi. It’s always worth taking a look to see if SoFi* offers a better interest rate.

The two lenders are very similar – CommonBond offers “CommonBridge,” a service that helps you find a new job in the event you lose yours. SoFi offers a similar service called Unemployment Protection.

SoFi’s variable rates are currently 2.355% – 6.280% APR with autopay, and its fixed rates are currently 3.375% – 6.74% APR, which is in line with what CommonBond is offering.

SoFi also doesn’t have a limit on how much you can refinance with them.

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Another lender to consider is Earnest. There is no maximum loan amount, and Earnest has a very slick application process. Interest rates start as low as 2.55% (variable) and 3.75% (fixed).

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Lastly, you could check out LendKey. It offers student loan refinancing through credit unions and community banks, but only offers variable rates in most states and fixed rates in a select few. The maximum amount to refinance with an undergraduate degree is $125,000, and the maximum amount to refinance with a graduate degree is $175,000.

All three of these options provide forbearance in case of economic hardship and offer similar loan options (5, 10, 15 year terms).

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Don’t Forget to Shop Around

As CommonBond initially conducts a soft pull on your credit, you’re free to continue to shop around for the best rates if you’re not happy with the rates it can provide. As the lender states on its website, if you apply for loans within a 30 day period, your credit won’t be affected as much.

Since CommonBond does have strict underwriting criteria, you should continue to shop around and don’t be discouraged if you are not approved. The market continues to get more competitive, and a number of good options are out there.

Customize Your Student Loan Offers with MagnifyMoney Comparison Tool

 

*We’ll receive a referral fee if you click on offers with this symbol. This does not impact our rankings or recommendations. You can learn more about how our site is financed here.

 

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Featured, Pay Down My Debt

Debt Snowball Vs Debt Avalanche — Which Strategy Works Best?

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The typical American household carries $15,762 of credit card debt. With the average credit card interest rate hovering around 13.35% today, that means households could easily spend more than $2,000 each year on credit card interest alone.

As more and more interest accrues, paying off what might have once been a relatively small amount of debt can easily start to feel like an impossible feat.

That’s why getting out of debt — especially when you have several different types of debt to deal with — requires a strategy.

Two of the most popular debt payoff strategies out there are the “debt snowball” and the “debt avalanche.” The snowball method has been popularized by personal finance celebrities like Dave Ramsey. By comparison, the debt avalanche is lesser known.

But which method actually works best? We did the math to find out.

Debt Snowball

Senior man playing with snow

First, list your debt from the smallest balance to the largest balance. Your goal is to eliminate the smallest debt first. You accomplish that by making only the minimum payment required on all your other debts. Then, take every extra dollar you have and put it toward the smallest debt. Once it’s paid off, you will throw everything into the next largest debt, plus an additional amount that is equal to whatever the previous debt’s minimum required payment was.

As you move from one debt to the next, you are creating an even bigger “snowball” to tackle your larger debts. That’s because you’re not only paying however much you can afford to set aside each month. You’re also adding to that amount when you add in the minimum required payments for each card that you pay off.

Why it works:

The snowball has two advantages. First, it provides you with a clear plan. Second, you build a lot of positive momentum by achieving wins early on, which will help you keep going. A recent study found most people do better with this approach because of the positive reinforcement of quick wins.

Debt Avalanche

Debt Avalanche - Man Skiing In Winter

To create a debt avalanche plan, list your credit card debt from the highest interest rate to the lowest. Pay the minimum due on all debt except the card with the highest interest rate. Put all extra money toward the most expensive debt until it is eliminated. Once that debt is paid off, take whatever you were paying on that bill and apply it to the next debt on your list, plus the minimum required payment from the debt you just paid off.

Why it works:

By dealing with debt that has the highest interest rates first, you can get out of debt faster and actually save more money on interest in the long run. It can feel more challenging than the snowball method, because you might be facing larger debt balances to start with. But the payoff is how much you’ll save on interest charges.

MagnifyMoney created a calculator that can easily help you see the difference between the snowball and avalanche methods.

Imagine you have three credit cards and can afford to pay $500 a month toward your debt:

  • $2,000 on a credit union credit card with a 6% interest rate
  • $6,000 on a credit card with a 19% interest rate
  • $8,000 on a store card with a 28% interest rate

Using the MagnifyMoney calculator, you see you could save $1,301 by using the avalanche method instead of the snowball method. And that is not surprising: by eliminating high interest rate debt first, you will end up paying less interest overall. You would also be out of debt faster.

The bottom line:

Both strategies will work, but you should pick the one that best fits your personality. If you easily feel overwhelmed by debt and feel like quitting, you should probably try the snowball method. You’ll get early “wins” and feel lots of motivation to keep going. If you’re more disciplined, the debt avalanche strategy might be your best fit.

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Pay Down My Debt, Personal Loans, Reviews

Best Egg Personal Loan Review

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Best Egg Personal Loan Review

Updated October 5, 2016

Best Egg is a personal loan company trying to make the borrowing process fast and simple for people looking to refinance credit cards or who need funds for personal use. In this review, we will examine the costs and loan application process for applying for a loan through Best Egg. We encourage everyone to shop around for the best rate, and you can find the best personal loans here.

Overview

Best Egg offers unsecured personal loans. These are installment loans with a fixed monthly payment for the life of the loan, but like a credit card, are not secured with property such as a car or home. Meaning you don’t have to provide collateral in order to receive a loan.

Best Egg offers loans up to $35,000 with up to a 5 year term. Your interest rate is determined by your credit history and can range from 5.99%-29.99% with an origination fee ranging from 0.99%-5.99%.

Best Egg loans are originated through Cross River Bank, which is located in New Jersey. You do not need to be a New Jersey resident to apply for a Best Egg loan.

Pros

The best features of Best Egg are the simple terms and competitive interest rates for borrowers with a strong, positive credit history. Beyond the interest charge and origination fee, there are virtually no fees with Best Egg.

The company charges $15 for a late payment and $15 for a returned payment, which is lower than the typical $25 fee. There are no application fees and the origination fee is deducted from your starting loan proceeds, so there is no out-of-pocket cost to get started. However, this does mean you need to factor in the origination fee when you request the amount you need for a loan.

There are no pre-payment fees, so if you are able to make extra payments or pay off your entire balance early, you will not be charged any additional fees.

Cons

Best Egg only offers payback periods of 3 years or 5 years. If you want a shorter loan payback period than 2 years or a longer payback period than 5 years, Best Egg will not meet your needs.

As a borrower, your interest rate is based on your credit score and is locked in at the time of origination. While some borrowers may qualify for a 5.99% interest rate and 1% origination fee, Best Egg does not disclose the requirements to qualify for its best rates.

Even at 1%, the origination fee is certainly a negative considering other personal loans like SoFi offer no origination fee and no pre-payment penalty.

The highest interest rates are nearly 30% with a 6% origination fee. These rates are comparable to the worst credit card interest rates and may not offer you any benefit compared to using a credit card, which has no origination fee.

At the worst interest rates, this is still much better than typical payday loans or auto title loans, but you may have lower cost options available including lending platforms like Avant.

What Do I Need to Qualify?

Best Egg loans are approved based on your credit history. If you qualify, you are assigned a letter grade which corresponds to an interest rate between 5.99% and 29.99%. Current rates are available here.

The application process requires giving your email, and Best Egg uses a “soft pull” on your credit report to determine whether you qualify and find out your interest rate. A soft pull does not impact your credit score.

When you apply, you will need your Social Security number and current contact information handy for the application process, which is typical for any loan application.

Who is this Best For?

If you have credit card debt with a high interest rate, refinancing with Best Egg could save you a lot of money on interest over the life your debt. If you can lower your interest rate and set a fixed payback period compared to the open ended time frame on a revolving credit account, you could easily save thousands of dollars.

The site suggests using loan proceeds to help pay for a move, vacation, home improvement, debt consolidation, home purchase, or vehicle purchase. This product may save you money compared to credit cards, but it is a best practice to avoid debt where possible, particularly for optional luxury purchases like a vacation.

What About the Fine Print?

One of the biggest benefits of using Best Egg compared to competitors is that loans with Best Egg do not come with a mountain of fine print. There is almost no fine print actually.

You do not pay unless you get a loan and the only fees you will encounter are the origination fee and from late payments and rejected payments from your bank account. That is really it. There is no catch.

Unless you’re in Massachusetts, then the fine print states that your minimum loan amount is $6,000.

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Alternatives

SoFi

One alternative for your personal loan needs is SoFi. SoFi charges no origination fee, no pre-payment penalty fees and offers larger loans up to $100,000. SoFi also offers longer loan terms with a 3, 5, and 7 year option.

SoFi offers fixed rates between 5.95% – 14.24% and variable rates between 4.91% – 11.43%. Although SoFi does not use FICO, you do need to be a prime or super-prime borrower. That means you must be current on all of your obligations. And if you ever filed for bankruptcy, you will not be approved.

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LendingClub

LendingClub is a social peer-to-peer lending site where your loan is funded by a large group of investors who each contribute to your loan. A $3,000 loan could be funded by as many as 120 individual investors.

LendingClub loans assign a letter grade which corresponds to an interest rate, similar to Best Egg. Interest rates are similar, ranging from 5.99% to 35.89%. The largest loan available on LendingClub is $40,000.

If you are unhappy with your interest rate at Best Egg, it could be worth applying at LendingClub to see how your rate comes in. Depending on your history, your rate may be better or worse than Best Egg. Just be aware: LendingClub is not available in Iowa or West Virginia.

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Always Shop Around

It doesn’t hurt your score to see your offer with Best Egg, but there are other personal loan providers who also offer a soft pull. Don’t just take the first offer you receive. You should always be shopping around for the best possible rate, especially because lenders offering a soft pull don’t harm your credit score.

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What Happens When My Debt Gets Sold?

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Overdue Notice bill debt

When you take out a loan or make a purchase with your credit card, you have a legal obligation to repay the money. However, there are many reasons why you might not be able to make a payment. Perhaps you lost your job, or you have other more pressing debts to pay.

Whatever the cause, if you don’t make a payment, you could be charged a late payment fee in addition to the accruing interest. If you continue not making payments, the original creditor might turn to a debt collection agency that will actively try to contact you and get you to repay the money. The agency could be a department within the creditor’s company, or it might be a third-party agency that is hired to collect your payment on the company’s behalf. Eventually, if the company doesn’t receive any money, it might sell the right to collect your debt to an outside debt collection agency.

You Now Owe the Collection Agency the Money

Once the debt buyer purchases your debt, the firm has a legal right to collect money from you. But why does this happen? Often the original creditor doesn’t feel that it’s worth the time to continue trying to collect the money from you, and they sell the account at a discount — sometimes just pennies on the dollar. The agency that buys the debt, often in large batches along with others’ debts, can make money even if it only collects a small portion of what you owe – although, of course, it will be happy to take the full amount.

You’ll See a New Account on Your Credit Reports

The three major credit-reporting bureaus, Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian, track and record activity related to your loans and credit accounts. When a collection agency buys your debt, the transfer of the debt’s ownership gets reported to bureaus. The bureaus will open a new account with the collection agency’s name and the amount owed on your credit report. The original creditor’s account’s status might change to something similar to “charged off,” “transferred,” or “paid.”

Rod Griffin, director of public education at Experian, says there could be a note on the account saying the debt was “sold to” or “transferred to” and the collection agency’s name. Likewise, the collection agency’s account on your credit report may have a note saying the debt was transferred or bought from the creditor.

In some cases, your debt could be sold from one collection agency to another. “[Experian’s] policy is that you only have one collection agency that can collect on that debt,” says Griffin. While the original creditor’s account remains on your report, the first collection agency might fall off and be replaced by the new collection agency. If it doesn’t, Griffin says you can file a dispute to get the first collection agency removed. Similarly, double-check the original account and report an error if it has an “open” account status.

The Derogatory Marks Fall Off Your Credit Reports at the Same Time

Many derogatory marks, including a collection account, can remain on your credit reports for up to seven years and 180 days from the date your debt is declared delinquent. Some people worry that when their debt is bought and transferred, the clock gets reset, but luckily that’s not the case.

The timeline is determined by the original date of delinquency, and by law, debt collection agencies must report the original delinquency date to the credit-reporting agencies. The date will stick with the debt, even if it transfers hands several times over.

Griffin says you might hear about other dates, the most recent update date or the reported date, for example. While those could change if you’re in contact with the collection agency, that won’t extend the time for a deletion. After seven years and 180 days, sometimes sooner, the original account and related collection accounts will be taken off your credit reports. They will no longer impact your credit score, although you might still be legally obliged to repay the money.

Consider Paying Off a Collection Account to Help Your Credit Score

FICO Score 9 and VantageScore 3.0, the most recent versions of FICO’s and VantageScore’s basic credit-scoring systems, ignore paid collection accounts when calculating a credit score. This is in contrast to previous scoring models that considered a collection account, even a paid one, a negative mark and adjusted your score accordingly. Most lenders rely on the previous credit-scoring models when screening applications, but it’s worth keeping the change in mind if you’re concerned about your credit score.

When you have an account that was sent or sold to a collection agency and is nearing the seven-year mark, it might make sense to wait and let the account drop off your reports. However, if you’re looking for a way to quickly improve your credit score, paying off a collection account could be an option.

Bottom Line

If you fall behind on your debt payments, your creditor might sell your past-due account to a debt collection agency. The transfer gets recorded on your credit reports, and you’ll now owe the agency money. Having an account sent or sold to collections can negatively impact your credit score. Although you might be able to improve your score by repaying the debt, you could need to wait up to seven years and 180 days from your first missed payment for the account and subsequent negative marks to fall off your credit reports.

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Pay Down My Debt

The Best Way to Deal with Law School Debt

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Statue of justice legal law lawyer

The burden of six-figure debt is the new norm for law school graduates. According to the American Bar Association, the average public law school graduate carries $88,000 in debt, and private law school graduates carry a crushing $127,000 in debt. If you’re a JD struggling to figure out how to start whittling down your debt, here’s what to do:

Step One: Take a Look at the Big Picture

You can’t develop your debt payoff strategy until you understand your financial big picture. Gaining a clear financial picture doesn’t have to be difficult. You can start by reading the free e-book, Richer in 7 Hours, which walks you through how to calculate your net worth, how to eliminate debt, and more. The key is finding out how much you spend and how much money you are bringing in. From there, you can figure out how much you can afford to put toward your loans over time. The book will help you understand your finances so you can create a strategy to eliminate your law school debt.

Step Two: Know Your Options

Once you’ve created a clear picture of your finances, you’ll need to understand the things you can do to manage and eliminate your debt.

For Federal Student Loan Debt

The federal government offers a variety of programs that help you manage your federal student loan debt. These options don’t apply to any of your private loans. If you have federal loans, you may qualify for income-driven repayment plans, loan consolidation, interest-free loan deferment, loan forbearance, repayment assistance, or Public Service Loan Forgiveness. These programs won’t lead you to rapid debt freedom, but they may alleviate some of the burden.

Income-Driven Repayment Plans

The federal government offers four income-based repayment programs:

  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE)
  • Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE)
  • Income-Based Repayment (IBR)
  • Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR)

We’ve outlined the major differences between the programs below.

 income based repayment chart

Under income-driven repayment plans, you will need to “recertify” your income and family size every year to determine your payments. That just means picking up the phone to call your lender and asking to re-enroll in the program. These programs can be helpful as you grow your income, or if you’re seeking Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

Loan Consolidation

If income-driven repayment programs won’t save you any money based on your salary, but you have a high level of debt relative to your income, consider federal loan consolidation. Federal loan consolidations group your loans into a single loan with a single interest rate, and they extend the amount of time you have to pay. Consolidated loans over $60,000 have 30-year payment periods.

If you choose to consolidate your federal loans, you will still be eligible for income-driven repayment programs if you qualify in the future. Direct consolidation loans are eligible for Public Service Loan Forgiveness as well.

Your new interest rate will be determined by taking the weighted average of the interest rates on all the loans you wish to consolidate. In some cases, a consolidation will result in a longer payoff period, and dragging out the length of the loan could result in your paying more in interest.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) offers relief to those working for the government or eligible nonprofits. In order to be eligible, you will need your loans to be on an income-driven repayment plan or 10-year standard payment plan and make 120 payments (10 years’ worth of service) before the remaining amount is forgiven. The 120 student loan payments do not have to be consecutive.

If your loans are in a grace period, deferment, forbearance, or default, or you are currently in school, you cannot make a payment toward the 120-payment limit. Only federal loans qualify for PSLF, so do not refinance through a private lender if you’re pursuing loan forgiveness.

If you qualify for PSLF, you will not owe taxes on the amount forgiven after 120 payments.

Deferment

During loan deferment, you do not have to make payments on your loans, but you must apply and qualify for loan deferment before you can cease payments. Qualifying situations include being in school (including an approved fellowship), up to three years of unemployment, up to three years of economic hardship, and during active military duty (and the 13 months following active military duty).

If you have subsidized loans including Direct Subsidized Loans, Federal Perkins Loans, or Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans, the government will usually pay interest during deferment.

But if you have other federal loans, interest accrues during deferment, but you do not have to pay interest on the loans during deferment. Instead, the interest will be “capitalized” or added onto your principal loan balance when you resume repayment.

Forbearance

If you do not qualify for loan deferment, you may qualify for loan forbearance. You can request forbearance for illness or financial hardship, but your lender doesn’t have to grant it. On the other hand, your lender must grant forbearance under certain qualifying circumstances. Qualifying situations include when you work in a service position where you’ve received a national service award, work in a low-income school, or are activated as a member of the National Guard, among many situations.

During forbearance, you do not have to make loan payments, but interest continues to accrue. You can either make interest-only payments, or you can allow the interest to be added to your loan balance when the forbearance period ends.

For Private Student Loan Debt

Private student loans don’t come with all the same programs as federal loans, so there are no forgiveness or income-driven repayment options available. Instead, try implementing some of the following strategies. Your best option may be to refinance your private loans at a lower interest rate. But before you go that route, consider these tips:

Loan Repayment Assistance Programs

Many schools want to encourage their alumni to work in public service, and they offer modest assistance to some qualifying individuals. Loan repayment assistance programs can differ from school to school, but you may find valuable help if you choose to go into public service.

Seek Out a Signing Bonus

Some firms will offer to assist you with student loans if you commit to a multiyear contract with them. If you have multiple offers, consider negotiating for a student loan repayment bonus. New lawyers reported repayment bonuses of $2,500-$75,000 when they signed multiyear contracts.

Become a Technical Expert

Lawyers with a science, medical, or engineering background may receive offers to pay off all their student loans if they choose to become patent attorneys or work in the U.S. Patent Office. Lawyers with technical expertise remain rare, so firms and the government compete over these types of lawyers.

Implement an Aggressive Payment Plan

You could take the scrappy way out by just getting aggressive with your payments. You can do this by attacking one loan at a time with the maximum amount you can afford and paying the minimum on your other loans. You can calculate the interest you’ll save and how quickly you can pay off your debt using the Snowball vs. Avalanche Calculator.

Before you start paying down your debts, be sure that you’ve got an emergency fund in place, and that you’re taking advantage of any employer matching on your 401(k) plan.

Do Not Pay Off Private Loans with Credit Cards

Purposely putting your debt on credit cards for the purpose of bankruptcy is fraud, and it could lead to jail time. If you’re facing default on your private loans, do not pay them with credit cards that you think can be bankruptible. Additionally, law school loans that have been transferred to your credit cards cannot be discharged in bankruptcy court.

For Federal and/or Private Loans

Refinance at a Lower Rate

If you’re interested in saving money on interest, the best thing you can do is refinance your student loans at a lower rate. But don’t refinance unless you feel confident that you will not need to use the flexible repayment options for federal loans as outlined above. Once a federal loan is refinanced through a private lender, it will no longer be eligible for programs like forgiveness, income-driven repayment, forbearance, or deferment. Private loans do not qualify for any of the loan repayment help outlined above.

Refinance your loans with a company that can offer you the lowest rates or the most flexible terms. You can use the Compare & Save tool to help you learn about your refinancing options.

Step Three: Implement Your Strategy

Now that you understand your financial picture, and you know your options, you can implement a plan that will help you manage or eliminate your law school debt. Taking the right actions will help you deal with your law school debt.

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How This California Couple Paid Off $100,000 of Debt in 2 Years

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Student Loan Debt
Illustration by Kelsey Wroten

When 31-year-old Priscilla Jones completed her MFA in film in 2011, she was left with a total of $96,000 of student loan debt from both her undergraduate and graduate studies. (She requested that we change her name for privacy reasons). Over the next three years, thanks to compounding interest charges, the original amount ballooned to $118,000. On her current payment plan, it would take another 15 years to pay off all her debt.

Rather than dragging the process out, she and her husband (we’ll call him Nathan), decided to aggressively pay down her debt. Over the next 22 months, they paid off $100,000 of the original loan balance — all while raising a young child in Los Angeles.

Here’s how they did it:

Making a pact

While Nathan, 41, was fully aware of Priscilla’s debt load when they got married in 2011, it wasn’t until 2014 — on Valentine’s Day, to be exact — when the couple opened the hood on Priscilla’s student loans to uncover what was lurking underneath.

“For the first few years of our marriage, we just couldn’t afford to buckle down to pay them off, so we didn’t really take a close look,” says Nathan.

The catalyst for examining Priscilla’s loans? In less than two months, one of the largest loans Priscilla carried — a total of $88,000 — would come out of forbearance. The additional loan payment would triple their monthly bill from $300 to $900. Two weeks later, they decided to dump their savings accounts, putting $24,000 toward her largest debt.

And then they made a pact: They would do everything they could to pay off the loans within three years.

Working overtime

On top of working a full-time job in operations at a tech startup, Priscilla took side jobs, working an additional 20 to 30 hours a week. She kept $600 a month from her salary for personal spending and used the rest to pay off her student loans. She and Nathan made sure to keep $5,000 to $10,000 in an emergency fund at all times.

Bonuses and promotions

They lived off of Nathan’s salary in management at a tech startup, and Nathan’s work bonuses went straight toward paying off the debt. When Nathan started his current job in 2012, he earned $53,000, including bonuses. His company soon saw tremendous growth. As a result, Nathan quickly ascended the ranks, and his income spiked dramatically. The couple’s combined salary in 2014 was $170k and $160k in 2015, and every penny they could pinch went toward their debt load.

“We think of ourselves as being very fortunate,” says Nathan. “But even if my income hadn’t grown as it did, we would’ve used the same mindset and tactics to pay off our loans. Instead of it taking three years, it would’ve taken 10.”

Never ‘act your wage’

Although they were in a high income bracket, no one would have guessed as much by looking at their spending habits. They lived as frugally as possible to focus on paying off the student loans. They stayed in the two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment in Venice that Nathan had locked down at a low rate during the recession. They drove two beat-up cars that were paid off in full and had good gas mileage.

“We really had to examine our needs versus wants,” says Priscilla. While they’ve never been big spenders, and value community and experiences, they had to put some of their wants on hold. For instance, Nathan, who loves to invest, contributed just the minimum toward his employer’s 401(k) to qualify for the full matching contribution. Priscilla curbed any frivolous spending on clothes. They also put off getting new carpet and furniture, both of which needed desperately to be replaced.

They shopped at the Dollar Store, didn’t buy clothes that required dry cleaning, and refrained from traveling for pleasure. They paid as many bills as they could on their credit cards, which were paid in full each month. Any reward points they racked up went toward gift cards for restaurants and movies. A rare dinner out would be at El Pollo Loco or In-N-Out Burger.

“We turned it into a game, and had fun with it,” explains Priscilla. For instance, the couple placed a chalkboard in their kitchen and wrote on it the outstanding debt amounts and interest rates, along with specific dates for hitting their goals.

The ‘avalanche’ method

To prioritize which debts would be paid off first, they decided to use the ‘debt avalanche’ method. They aggressively knocked off the loan with the highest interest rate first, then worked their way down. They would challenge each other to save as much as they could toward paying off the loan. “Working together to pay off debt helped us bond,” adds Nathan.

“To stay motivated, we would obsessively calculate how much interest we were paying each day,” says Priscilla. “At one point we were paying $37 a day in interest alone.”

Taking time to celebrate

When they reached a debt payoff total of $100,000 in February 2015, they decided to ease up on their loan repayments. To celebrate, they rented a limo and had a night out on the town. They also finally were able to give their apartment a facelift. “We no longer have to move furniture around to hide the holes in the carpet anymore,” Priscilla says.

In September of this year, the couple made their final loan repayment and are completely debt- free.

They say that it’s essential to maintain perspective when paying off student debt.
“Remember, you’re not dying,” Nathan says. “Just focus on paying it off, and your debt will get crushed.”

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6 Personal Loans for 600 to 700 Credit Scores

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7 Personal Loans for 600 to 700 Credit Scores

If you have a less-than-perfect credit and want to pay off credit card debt, fund home improvement projects, or pay for unexpected expenses, then finding a lender that will consider your credit might seem like an uphill battle.

Refinancing high-interest debt with a personal loan can quickly cut down the amount of interest you’re paying, which effectively allows you to pay if off in less time. You particularly want to avoid payday and title loan lenders at all costs.

Many personal loan companies approve people with scores as low as 600. The best way to shop for the best deal is to use the MagnifyMoney Personal Loan Shopping Tool. With this tool, you can get prequalified for personal loans without hurting your credit score. With just one application (which takes less than five minutes), multiple providers will compete for your business and offer you real rates. You can start shopping here.

If you don’t want to use the tool, you can go to each personal loan company individually. Here are 7 personal loans for people with credit scores of 600 to 700. Read below to see if one is right for you!

1. LendingClub

LendingClub offers loans of up to $40,000, for individuals with a minimum credit score of 600. Its APR ranges from 5.99% to 35.89%. LendingClub also uses a soft credit pull to determine your rate, which will not affect your credit.

The Fine Print

In order to qualify for a LendingClub personal loan you must:

  • Not have more than 5 hard credit inquiries in the last 5 months
  • Have at least two active credit accounts open
  • Have a credit history of at least 36 months
  • Debt-to-income ratio of less than 40%
  • Be able to verify employment and income

Once you have met the minimum criteria, LendingClub uses its own scoring system to determine what amount you can borrow as well as your rate.

You can borrow money for up to 60 months, but it does charge up-front (origination) fees depending on credit worthiness, which come out of the loan amount.

Pros

  • Can see your rate with a soft credit pull
  • Will consider applicants with credit scores as low as 600
  • Offers very competitive interest rates for people with scores below 700
  • The application process only take a few minutes

Cons

  • Missed payments or items in collections will result in your application being rejected
  • Loan processing could take a week or more
  • APR can be as high as 35.89%
  • It does charge origination fees
  • Is not available in Iowa or West Virginia

LendingClub will approve people with credit scores as low as 600. If approved, the interest rates offered can be very competitive and the online application process is easy. This is good first stop for anyone with a score of 600 or higher to find the best deal.

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2. BestEgg

BestEgg offers personal loans up to $35,000 for people with credit scores as low as 640. APRs range from 5.99% to 29.99%. You can check your rate without hurting your credit score, and BestEgg has an excellent application process (that can result in funding your loan very quickly).

The Fine Print

BestEgg does charge an origination fee, which can be between 0.99% and 5.99%. However, there is no prepayment penalty, and you can pay off your loan early without penalty.

 

Pros

  • Can see your rate with a soft credit pull
  • Will consider applicants with credit scores as low as 660
  • Offers very competitive interest rates
  • Fast application process and fast funding

Cons

  • APR can be as high as 29.99%
  • It does charge origination fees

BestEgg offers competitive rates and a quick online process to get your loan. It is an excellent option for people with less than perfect scores.

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3. Avant

Avant offers access to loans from $1,000 to $35,000. There is no prepayment penalty. It is possible to get your loan as soon as the next business day. Although every case is unique, we have seen Avant accept people with credit scores as low as 580 be approved.

The Fine Print

Interest rates range from 9.95% to 36.00%. Avant does charge an up-front origination fee that ranges from 0.95% – 3.75%, which is lower than most of the competition.

Checking your rates through Avant only requires a soft pull to see your rate, which does not affect your credit score, and there are no prepayment penalties.

A personal loan through Avant received an “A” from MagnifyMoney’s Transparency Score.

Pros

  • Approved people with lower credit scores
  • “A” Transparency Score
  • Can see your rate with a soft credit pull
  • Fixed terms, fixed interest rate, no prepayment penalties

Cons

  • Interest rates as high as 36%
  • Avant charges an origination fee
  • Not available in Colorado, Iowa and West Virginia

Avant is a good option for people with less than perfect credit. You can check your rate without hurting your score and it has an “A” transparency score.

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4. OneMain

OneMain offers loans up to $25,000 for individuals with credit scores starting at 600. It offers terms of up to 60 months and APR ranges from 25.10% to 36.00%.

The Fine Print

In order to be accepted for a OneMain Loan, you must live near a OneMain branch, as a face-to-face meeting is required to finalize the loan. OneMain personal loans are not available in Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Nevada, Rhode Island, Vermont, or Washington D.C.

In order to qualify you must have:

  • Verifiable, steady income
  • No bankruptcy filings, ever
  • Be at least 18 years of age
  • Have at least some established credit history
  • Credit score of at least 600

If, at any time during the application process, OneMain becomes aware that you intend to use the personal loan for gambling, your loan application will be cancelled. OneMain personal loans cannot be used for business expenses or tuition.

You cannot see your OneMain rate until it performs a hard credit pull, which does affect your credit, and the OneMain personal loan earns a “B” Transparency score.

Pros

  • Credit score as low as 600
  • Fixed Rates
  • No Prepayment penalty
  • Fixed terms
  • Convenient location, at OneMain branches

Cons

  • APR ranges from 25.10% – 35.99%
  • Loans cannot be used for business expenses or tuition
  • Cannot see rate without a hard credit pull
  • Personal loans only available up to $10,000
  • Loans not available in Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Nevada, Rhode Island, Vermont, or Washington D.C.
  • You must visit a OneMain branch to complete the loan.

The OneMain personal loan caters to people with low credit scores, or who would prefer to complete the personal loan application process at a branch, rather than online.

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5. Freedomplus

Freedomplus offers loans ranging from $5,000 to $35,000 that can be used for everything from debt consolidation, to unexpected expenses. APR ranges from 8.47% to 29.99%.

Its biggest selling point is the same-day approval and availability of funds within 48 hours, a lifesaver in some circumstances.

The Fine Print

In order to qualify for a Freedomplus loan, you must:

  • Be 18 years or older
  • Be a legal US resident
  • Have a valid ID
  • Minimum credit score of 700
  • At least $25,000 in verifiable income
  • No bankruptcies in the last two years

Freedomplus charges origination fees ranging from 1.00% to 5.00%, which is deducted from the loan amount before you receive the funds. There are no prepayment penalties.

The Freedomplus personal loan scores a “B” Transparency score because its fee structure and much of the fine print is unclear or not covered by the final contract.

You can prequalify with a soft credit pull, which does not affect your credit score. However, Freedomplus requires a phone screening with each applicant before the loan is approved.

Pros

  • Will approve credit scores as low as 700
  • The phone screening may improve your chances of being approved for the loan
  • Same-day approval and funds within 48 hours
  • No prepayment penalty
  • Can prequalify with a soft credit pull

Cons

  • APR ranges from 8.47% to 29.99%
  • The fee structure is not readily available for review
  • Origination fee of 1.00% to 5.00% applies

The Freedomplus personal loan is a good option for you if you have less than perfect credit, and need access to funds quickly, without visiting a physical branch.

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6. Prosper

The Prosper personal loan process is a little different than a traditional lender. It is not a bank, but rather a peer-to-peer lender. Once you have applied, and checked loan terms and rates, you create a loan “listing” that then appears on in the Prosper marketplace.

From these listings, peers (investors) choose which loans they would like to finance. When your loan listing is financed, the money is transferred to your bank account.

Prosper offers loans from $2,000 to $35,000, and APR ranges from 5.99% to 36.00%. It offers loans terms of either 36 or 60 months. Your APR is determined during the application process, and is based on a credit rating score created by Prosper. Your score is then shown with your loan listing to give potential lenders an idea of your creditworthiness.

The Fine Print

Your loan listing will remain active for 14 days. After 14 days, your loan must be at least 70% funded to receive the funds. If you are not 70% funded within 14 days, you must reapply to have your loan re-listed.

Origination fees range from 1% to 5% and are based on your Prosper score. In order to qualify, you must:

  • Have a bank account
  • Have a social security number
  • No more than 7 inquiries on your credit in the last six months
  • A verifiable, steady income
  • A credit-to-debt ratio of less than 50%
  • At least three open accounts, such as checking, savings, and credit card.
  • No bankruptcies in the last year

A returned payment may result in a $15 fee, and late payments past 15 days are charged a 5% fee, with a minimum of $15.

Prosper’s overall fine print is very clear is its fees are quite minimal, so it scores it an “A” Transparency Score. Also, you can check your Prosper rate with a soft credit pull, which will not affect your credit score.

Pros

  • Minimum credit score of 640
  • Can see your rate with a soft pull
  • No prepayment penalties
  • Paying off a Prosper loan can reduce your APR on future Prosper loans

Cons

  • Only 14 days to secure financing from peer lenders
  • Origination fee of 1% to 5% applies
  • APR varies from 5.99% – 36.00%

Prosper is a flexible alternative with a low-end APR that beats a credit card.

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Shop Around to Find the Best Deal

If you have made past credit mistakes, or have very little credit, there are personal loans out there for you. Many of these lenders offer rates much lower than what you would be paying on a credit card, shaving month and hundred or thousands of dollars off of your debt.

Don’t give up on a personal loan just because of your credit – there are options out there for you. It never hurts to shop around and look for the best rates available, especially if the lender does a soft credit pull to show you your options.

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5 Steps to Take When Your Car is Repossessed

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For the most part, you will know ahead of time when a car repossession is on the horizon. But, even when you have an inkling your car is about to get taken away, walking outside to find it missing is upsetting.

A car repo can jeopardize your mobility long-term. And if you don’t have access to public transportation or a friend to give you a lift, having no car to get to and from work could mean you’ll lose your job, which triggers other financial issues. If your car has been repossessed (or it’s a possibility it will happen soon) here’s what you need to know and the options for getting it back.

Step 1: Take a Record of Any Property Damage

There are laws in place to protect you when a repo company comes for the car. They can’t disturb the peace, use excessive force, damage your property or cause you harm in the process.

If you believe the repossession happened aggressively, you may have a case for reimbursement of damage or the return of your car. The repo agency may also get hit with a penalty for their actions. Take photos of the damage as a backup and get a second opinion from an attorney.

You should also have a record of what the car looks like and any damages before it’s repossessed. Otherwise, could turn into a bit of a “he said, she said” debate.

Step 2: Find Out Why Your Car Was Taken

Technically, a car isn’t “yours” until you pay off the car note. If you default, in most states the company financing your car has the right to take it back without warning you. The same applies if you’re leasing a car. Miss a few payments and the lessor can take back the property.

When a repo occurs, contact the creditor as soon as possible. Unlike when a contractor tows your car for minor offenses like unpaid parking tickets, after a repo, your car doesn’t wait patiently on a lot until you bring your bills current. The car can be sold to recover the financial loss.

Fortunately, many states require that you’re notified of the pending auction or sale of your vehicle beforehand, so you have a reasonable time to act. Ahead of the sale, you may be able to reinstate the auto loan, pay off the loan entirely or buy the car back. We’ll talk about each option for reclaiming your car in the next section.

Besides defaulting on a loan, in some states, your car may be repossessed when your insurance lapses. If you’ve stopped paying your car insurance, find out from your creditor or DMV if that’s the reason your car is missing and ask what the penalties are for not keeping insurance.

Step 3: Explore Options to Reclaim the Car

The rules for getting your car back when your payments are in default vary by state and contract, but according to the Federal Trade Commission, there are generally three options to discuss:

Reinstate Your Auto Loan: This will probably be the most affordable and less cumbersome option if it’s available to you. Reinstating the loan is when you pay the amount you’re behind plus all of the fees associated with the repossession including towing and storage to get it back.

Redeem Your Car: Redeeming the car means paying off the entire balance of the loan to get your car back. Going this route may not be feasible or smart if your car is worth less than you owe. Besides the entire loan amount, you’re also on the hook for the repossession fees.

Buy Your Car Back: Again, this option may not be possible if you’re having a hard time just making car payments. When you get the date and time of the auction your car will be in, you can attend and try to buy it back.

Step 4: Decide if You Can Afford to Get the Car Back

After going through each of your options, you may find you’re not financially stable enough to retrieve your car. Even in the best case scenario of reinstating your loan, you’ll need to have the means to make regular payments and maintain the car. If you can’t handle it, you may have to let the car go. There are some financial implications when giving up on the car as well.

When a creditor sells your car, it has to make a reasonable effort to get a fair market price for it. If the fair market price is less than how much you owe, you can be sued for deficiency; the difference between how much you owe and how much the car sells for.

Fortunately, if the car sells for more than what you owe, you also get to pocket the difference. You should get a notification of whatever you owe or if money is owed to you. Follow up on the resale yourself if you don’t. Unpaid deficiency can end up in collections.

Lastly, if you plan to wash your hands of the car loan, you could be in a deep financial hole all the way around and in the process of filing bankruptcy. If so, you may be able to include the car in the agreement and get it back. In this case, contact the attorney handling your bankruptcy right away.

Step 5: Get Your Belongings

Regardless of how you intend to resolve the repossession, you’re entitled to all of your belongings in the car. Whoever has your car should make a reasonable effort to protect your belongings from damage and theft. It’s a good practice to not leave any valuables in the car if you’re on the verge of repossession to avoid theft or damage.

Often, you’ll be contacted with the location where you can pick your stuff up. If you find anything missing or damaged, take notes. You may be able to reduce your deficiency bill with proof that you experienced property loss.

Final Word: Act early

If you know making future car payments is going to be a struggle, you’ll benefit the most from acting early to avoid the costs of repossession. Here are a few steps you may be able to take:

  • Negotiate: If you’re going through a temporary hardship, you may be able to work out a short-term deal of reduced or excused late auto payments. You won’t know unless you ask. Be sure to get any form of agreement in writing.
  • Sell your car: Selling a car with a lien can be difficult, but not impossible. You have the best shot at selling if the car is worth more than you owe. Once sold use public transportation or a carpool for the time being.
  • Refinance the loan: You may be able to refinance to a lesser monthly payment before things go south. Keep in mind, refinancing may come with processing fees and other costs, so you need to factor them into the equation.
  • Surrender the car yourself: If you’re already in default and know the repossession is coming, you can give up the car on your own terms. No dramatic car tow scene necessary and you can clear the car of your belongings. Then if you decide to redeem your car or reinstate the loan, you won’t have to pay some of the repossession fees.

Having your car repossessed is scary, but even when you hit rock bottom, there are solutions. If you put aside the emotions and think logically, you can recover. Your best move is to prevent it and keep the lines of communication open with the company servicing your auto loan.
If it’s too late for that, your main choices (depending on your contract and state) are to bring the loan back current and fork up repossession costs, pay-off the loan, buy the car back or give up the car entirely.

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